12 March 2013

Never Trust A Politician To Defend Your Right To Own A Gun



Several previously unreported Oval Office recordings and White House memos from the Nixon years show a conservative president who at times appeared willing to take on the National Rifle Association, a powerful gun lobby then as now, even as his aides worried about the political ramifications.
"I don't know why any individual should have a right to have a revolver in his house," Nixon said in a taped conversation with aides. "The kids usually kill themselves with it and so forth." He asked why "can't we go after handguns, period?"
Nixon went on: "I know the rifle association will be against it, the gun makers will be against it." But "people should not have handguns." He laced his comments with obscenities, as was typical.
Nixon made his remarks in the Oval Office on May 16, 1972, the day after a would-be assassin shot and paralyzed segregationist presidential candidate George Wallace. As president, Nixon never publicly called for a ban on all handguns. Instead, he urged Congress to pass more modest legislation banning Saturday night specials, which were cheaply made, easily concealed and often used by criminals.

While the GOP has done decent job over the years defending gun rights, especially relative to the Dems, it’s important to remember that party affiliation is no guarantee that a politician isn’t secretly a statist of the highest order.  You must always be vigilant, no matter who is elected.  At the end of the day, all politicians are pandering liars, and campaign promises mean nothing.  What matters is the laws they propose, pass and/or sign into law.  And if any politician, whether Democrat, Republican, Libertarian, Green Party, etc. works towards proposing additional gun control laws or refuses to support the repeal of current gun laws, it’s time for said politician to find a new job.  The ability to defend one’s person and property is fundamentally assured with keeping and bearing arms, and any politician that wishes to trample on that right needs to find a new line of work.